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Syllabus for English 327
(The Romantics):
Romanticism and War, Fall 2006

Monday, August 28

Note: here and throughout this syllabus, the first (less indented) list of readings is required, while the second (more indented) list of readings is supplemental and optional. Here, for example, the first three bullet points include required readings, while the two sites linked in the following, more indented bullet points send you to materials that are recommended for exploration but are not required.

We will go over the syllabus and course policies first, then discuss today's readings. Please come to class well prepared for that discussion.

Your written assignment is simple: go to the course discussion board on Pioneer Web. (Click on the course name, then choose "Communication" on the left, then choose "Discussion Board.") In the appropriate forum--you'll see it--post a brief self-introduction. This will help us get to know each other and also confirm that everyone can post on the board.


Wednesday, August 30

Group 1 response: Choose one issue (narrower than the French Revolution itself) or one metaphor that arises in two or more of these texts and explore the use and implications of that issue or metaphor.


Monday, September 4

Group 2 response: Using any moment or passage from Group 1's responses as a jumping-off point, extend the issues we discussed for Wednesday into the readings for today.


Wednesday, September 6

Group 3 response: help us make the transition from our previous readings to this novel by connecting one short passage from any text we've already read to one short passage in Desmond. Explain why this connection caught your attention and why you want to call it to ours.


Monday, September 11

Group 1 response: open response.


Wednesday, September 13

  • Smith, Desmond, 312-414

Group 2 response: open response.


Monday, September 18

  • Mary A. Favret, from Romantic Correspondence: Women, Politics, and the Fiction of Letters (1993)

  • Katherine Binhammer, "Revolutionary Domesticity in Charlotte Smith's Desmond" (1999)

Group 3 response: open response.


Wednesday, September 20

Group 1 response: open response.


Monday, September 25

  • Wordsworth, The Prelude (1805 version), Books I-II and VIII-XIII

Group 2 response: open response.


Wednesday, September 27

  • Wordsworth criticism--see the assignment below.

Each of you will choose a scholarly article or book that concerns Wordsworth's writings, especially those we have read together. You will come to class prepared to give the class a quick overview of the critical author's argument. In preparing your comments, have your later research papers in mind: for what kind of paper would your source be especially useful?


Monday, October 2

  • George Gordon, Lord Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Cantos I and II (1812)

  • Philip W. Martin, Heroism and History: Childe Harold I and II and the Tales" (2004)

    • Dictionary of Literary Biography (Grinnell only): Byron as poet

    • The Life and Work of Lord Byron on englishhistory.net provides good basic information. Aside from that site, there is remarkably little useful online material about Byron.

Group 3 response: open response.


Wednesday, October 4

  • Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto IV (1818)

  • Malcolm Kelsall, "Byron's Politics" (2004)

Group 1 response: Today's readings pair Kelsall's general analysis of Byron's politics with a specific imaginative work, the last canto of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage. Discuss how some specific aspect of the poetry supports or complicates what Kelsall says about Byron's political beliefs.


Monday, October 9

  • George Gordon, Lord Byron, The Giaour (1813)

  • Marilyn Butler, "The Orientalism of Byron's Giaour" (1988)

Group 2 response: open response.


Wednesday, October 11

  • Walter Scott, Waverley (1814), 33-99

Group 3 response: Waverley is routinely called the first historical novel. (Some critics dispute that claim, but don't let that trouble you for the moment.) Keeping in mind the idea that Scott is writing more or less a new sort of book, look for ways in which he engages his readers in the process of making sense of its genre. You might consider what explicit statements Scott makes about other genres, the way he creates one or more personae for the "author" in the text, or how he apologizes for certain features of the text.


FALL BREAK
Monday, October 23

  • Scott, Waverley, 100-195

Group 1 response: open response.


Wednesday, October 25

Library day! Details to be announced.


Monday, October 30

  • Scott, Waverley, 195-347

Group 2 response: open response.


Wednesday, November 1

  • Scott, Waverley, 347-494

Group 3 response: open response.


Monday, November 6

  • Jane Austen, Persuasion (1818), 1-98 (including the Biographical Notice of the Author)

Group 1 response: open response.


Wednesday, November 8

  • Austen, Persuasion, 99-203

  • We will also spend some class time discussing annotated bibliographies today.

Group 2 response: open response.


Monday, November 13

  • Austen criticism--see the assignment below.

Each of you will choose a scholarly article or book that concerns Austen's writings, especially Persuasion. You will come to class prepared to give the class a quick overview of the critical author's argument. In preparing your comments, have your later research papers in mind: for what kind of paper would your source be especially useful?

If you are in Group 3, this is your response day, and you should write an annotation of your source as if you were doing it for your annotated bibliography. Your annotations will become the subject of a preparatory annotation workshop in class.


PAPER PROSPECTUS DUE
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14TH AT 5:00


Wednesday, November 15

  • Percy Bysshe Shelley, "Ode to the West Wind" (1820)

  • Shelley, A Defence of Poetry (1821) [moved below due to class cancellation]

  • James Chandler, "History's Lyre: The 'West Wind' and the Poet's Work" (1998/2002)

    • Dictionary of Literary Biography (subscription only): Shelley as poet and prose writer

    • The Keats-Shelley House is a good starting point for finding the digital Shelley. None of the amateur sites online can capture Shelley as well as his own words in Stuart Curran's e-text of the notes to Queen Mab.

[Response moved due to class cancellation]


Monday, November 20

  • Shelley, A Defence of Poetry (1821)

  • Shelley, The Mask of Anarchy (1819)

  • Shelley, "England in 1819" (1819)

  • Susan Wolfson, "Poetic Form and Political Reform: The Mask of Anarchy and 'England in 1819'" (1997/2002)

Group 1 response: open response.


Wednesday, November 22

NO WEDNESDAY CLASS--
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY DUE BY 12:00


Monday, November 27

  • Byron, Don Juan, Dedication and Cantos I and II

Group 2 response: open response.


Wednesday, November 29

  • Byron, Don Juan, Cantos III-V

Group 3 response: open response.


Monday, December 4

PROGRESS REPORT DUE TODAY BY EMAIL

  • Byron, Don Juan, Cantos VI-VIII

Group 1 response: open response.


Wednesday, December 6

Last day: wrapping up, composing class cheers and slogans for the big finals parade.


Thursday, December 14

FINAL PAPER DUE BY NOON

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